Open Office Loan Agreement

OpenOffice.org was introduced under the LGPL v. 2.1 and sun Industry Standard Source License (SISSL), a license approved by the Open Source Initiative (OSI). In the summer of 2005, the OSI decided to limit the distribution of licences and simplify the choice of licenses. In accordance with this objective, Sun withdrew the SISSL and encouraged the projects that used it to do the same. OpenOffice.org will retire SISSL. OpenOffice.org 2.x source code from that date (from version 2.0 Beta 2) will only be allowed under the LGPL. (The source of the 1.x code line remains doubly conceded.) This change is not retroactive and the code that was granted prior to the announcement is still under LGPL and SISSL license. Users are not affected. For more information on simplification, check out our FAQ on this topic. Use the LGPL v3 OpenOffice.org from OpenOffice.org 3.0 beta. Oracle Contributor Agreement is identical to the Sun Contributor agreement. Sun Microsystems Inc.

Contributor Agreement for OpenOffice.org has introduced an addition excluding non-essential contributions such as extensions and documentation from the common copyright allocation, provided that these components are not included in the product OpenOffice.org that can be downloaded by OpenOffice.org. The new agreement also protects against patent abuse and abuse and therefore works with LGPL v3 to ensure a more stable open-source community. The OCA/SCA also provides for increased patent protection and provides an exception for extensions and documents that are not included in previous agreements. Many open source projects require copyright allocation so that the code base as a whole can be legally protected by an entity without having to worry about copyright for different parts. Other important examples of projects requiring copyright allocation include the Mono project and the Evolution project, both of which require the transfer of copyright to Novell. The Red Hat Directory Server project requires the award of copyright to Red Hat. The Oracle Contributor agreement is very liberal, as it requires copyright sharing instead of transferring it completely, and also guarantees that published contributions will remain forever under an open source license. The move to LGPL v3 was discussed by the OpenOffice.org project managers and identified by the majority of project managers as a good step. By switching to LGPL v3, OpenOffice.org and Sun demonstrate a strong commitment to the LGPL and LPG and open source versions in general. Version 3 has the advantage of being clearer on different aspects and offering better patent protection.

. The PDL was designed for open source documentation that is not intended to be included in the product OpenOffice.org. Before a particular document under the PDL can be included in the product OpenOffice.org, it must be converted into an OCA contribution. For this reason, it is generally best to make all contributions to OpenOffice.org as part of the OCA. All contributions to the source code require that the code be automatically available under LGPL. Oracle asks developers to complete the Contributor Oracle Agreement (OCA) to standardize copyright. The OCA ensures that Oracle can defend license violations if necessary. For all contributions not accepted, the property simply belongs to the contributor.

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