Who Is Involved In The Paris Climate Agreement

Adaptation – the measures to be taken to deal with the effects of climate change – is much more important under the Paris Agreement than it has done so far under the UNFCCC. As well as the parties will make contributions to the reduction, the Agreement requires all parties to plan and implement adjustment efforts “where appropriate” and encourages all parties to report on their adjustment efforts and/or needs. The agreement also provides for a review of progress in adaptation and the adequacy and effectiveness of adjustment support in the overall inventory that will be completed every five years. Since the Paris Agreement is expected to apply after 2020, the first formal inventory of the agreement will not be carried out until 2023. However, as part of a decision attached to the agreement, the parties decided to restart the five-year cycle with a “facilitation dialogue” on collective progress in 2018 and the presentation of the NDC by 2030 to 2020. Finally, in 2019, the first One Planet event was held in Paris, on the occasion of the repopulation of the Green Climate Fund, in order to seek synergies, to develop innovative climate finance to help communities and countries on the front lines of climate change. The alliance of small island states and least developed countries, whose economies and livelihoods are most affected by the negative effects of climate change, has taken the initiative to address losses and damage as a particular theme of the Paris Agreement. [33] However, developed countries were concerned that looking at the issue as a separate issue that goes beyond adaptation would create additional climate funding or imply legal responsibility for catastrophic climate events. In addition, the agreement establishes a new mechanism to “facilitate the implementation and promotion of respect.” This “non-contradictory” expert panel will try to help countries that are lagging behind their commitments get back on track. There is no penalty for non-compliance.

The EU and its member states are individually responsible for ratifying the Paris Agreement. There was a strong preference for the EU and its 28 Member States to simultaneously table their ratification instruments to ensure that neither the EU nor its Member States commit to fulfil commitments that are strictly the other` and there was concern that differences of opinion on each Member State`s share of the EU reduction target and the British vote to leave the EU would delay the Paris Pact. [72] However, on 4 October 2016, the European Parliament approved the ratification of the Paris Agreement[60] and the EU tabled its ratification instruments on 5 October 2016 with several EU Member States. [72] Unlike the Kyoto Protocol, which set legally binding emission reduction targets (and penalties only for non-compliance) for industrialized countries alone, the Paris Agreement requires all countries – rich, poor, developed and developing – to take their share and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. To this end, the Paris Agreement provides for greater flexibility: commitments that countries should make are not included, countries can voluntarily set their emissions targets and countries will not be penalized if they do not meet their proposed targets. But what the Paris agreement requires is to monitor, report and reassess, over time, the objectives of individual and collective countries, in order to bring the world closer to the broader objectives of the agreement.

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